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Arugula Blossoms

March 13, 2014

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If you’ve grown arugula, you know that eventually you’ll have arugula blossoms. Usually they signal the end of the arugula harvest when the leaves are larger and too strong for most palates.

Until I visited Specialty Produce recently I wasn’t aware that they’re a prize to be had at venues such as the Santa Monica Farmers Market. You may find them in your local farmers market.

In past seasons, I’ve used a handful in quaint bouquets but most of them went to the compost bin.

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Up close they look less weedy and more like a wildflower inviting closer inspection. The cream-colored petals have purple veins and a yellow center.

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After searching the net and reading about “arugula blossoms” I decided to harvest my “crop.” I shared half with my friend, Betsy who is an adventuresome cook.

You really have to go to the Specialty Produce website where one of their 1447 products listed is arugula blossoms. “Arugula blossoms offer a peppery flavor and spice with nutty undertones,” they say. You’ll also find links to recipes such as Asparagus with Spring Vinaigrette and Arugula Blossoms, which I plan to try later this week.

And then for a fun read go to theKitchn website where Emily Ho does a Seasonal Spotlight on arugula blossoms.

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For lunch yesterday I grabbed some greens from the garden and had a flower salad with arugula blossoms, violas and calendula petals. In the future, my arugula blossoms will come to the kitchen instead of going to the compost bin.

Alice Waters on Taste

On Growing Broccoli