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Growing Celery in the Winter Garden

January 15, 2014

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Celery is an easy and rewarding crop for the winter garden. It’s so convenient to go to the garden and cut a few stalks to cook with other vegetables or an entree. Celery makes everything taste better.

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This is the first year I’ve grown celery in the ground. Last winter I chronicled my celery experiment–grown in a pot from the end of a celery bunch. You can read about that here and hereYou’ll also find some reasons why buying organic celery or growing your own is a good idea.

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I planted seeds in the early fall but knew that germination could be tricky. 

So when I found a six-pack at my favorite nursery, I bought it and planted the celery in the eight inch wide trench of garden soil enriched with compost.

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The trench directs more water to the celery in my sandy soil.

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And here it is growing in the winter sun next to the ‘Bull’s Blood’ beets. Red-green plant combinations add beauty to the winter garden.

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I harvest a few stalks almost daily for cooking and salads from my cut and come again celery .Read a post from Barbara Pleasant about cutting celery. She overwinters it in her garden as a “permanent edible." 

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Today I’ll make another round of celery salt from the dried leaves. See my post Homemade Celery Salt for directions.

Now I’m wondering again why I never planted celery in the winter garden.

Dust of Snow

Mollie Katzen, The Heart of the Plate and Gardenista