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Harvest Monday: Flowers in the Edible Garden

May 20, 2013

Here are some of the flowers in my edible garden. Though some are edible, they all recruit food soldiers (beneficial insects) in the pest wars. (Do you remember seeing the calendulas, Iceland poppies and violas in my winter garden this year?)

Read more about reasons to tuck flowers with the veggies in my previous post Insectaries, Flowers and PollinationFollow the link at the end of the post for a list of plants that attract beneficial insects.

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The bi-color sweet peas finished this week and I collected the seed. The larkspur, all relocated volunteers, edge several of the raised beds. The dainty white flowers are from cilantro.

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The intensity of the blue-purple larkspur is enchanting. I’ve had bouquets upstairs and down this week and have given several away. (Larkspur is poisonous–definitely not edible).

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The larkspur and radicchio towered to five feet in last year’s garden.

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This is the radicchio in early December.

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The lanky radicchio in May, sacrificed for a bouquet. (Better here than the compost bin).

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On Sunday, the radicchio bouquet with added alstromeria and yarrow graced the table in the foyer at church. 

Now, what flowers for the summer garden? Zinnias and marigolds for sure. Maybe some wispy cosmos if there’s room. 

For a list of plants that attract beneficial insects, click the link.

Harvest Monday is hosted by Daphne’s Dandelions. It’s a time to share what you’re harvesting in your garden or how you’re storing or using it.

Growing Corn in A Small Garden

Citrus and Avocado Training by UC Davis/California Center for Urban Horticulture