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In My San Diego Garden & Kitchen

In My San Diego Garden & Kitchen

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Heirloom tomatoes are doing very well in my new Corten steel raised beds this summer. The complex flavors of Cherokee Purple (left) and a new favorite, Black Krim (right) make them my first choice. 

The soil in the new tomato bed is full of compost and very rich. Every crop I’ve planted seems to do exceedingly well. At two feet in height there’s room for the roots and the sun warms the soil. The five tomato plants have grown very tall which makes the harvest more difficult. There will be better air circulation next summer when I only plant four tomatoes in the same 4 x 8 foot space. 

I’m happy to have tomatoes after several summers of near crop failure due to damp, foggy weather. Most days I have about forty or more tomatoes on my kitchen island. I’m just starting to cook some for the freezer.

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I plant Stupice and Early Girl to ensure I get some tomatoes since they are reliable here in the fog belt. Yesterday, I picked nine pounds of Early Girl tomatoes. My neighbors love these. 

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Tomatoes stuffed with corn and black beans work well with the firm side walls of the Early Girl. These were delicious with the bread crumb and grated cheese topping.

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I’ve had hundreds of Stupice tomatoes. I give these little guys away with abandon. They’re slightly larger than cherry tomatoes this year–about two inches in diameter. They’re perfect for roasting or “melting.” 

Last night I combined them with slivers of onion, minced garlic, olive oil and salt and paper and roasted at 400 degrees. I served the intensely flavored tomatoes over salmon. Next time, I’ll tell you about the garden corn.

The roasted tomatoes freeze well and then can be added to pasta for a quick dinner. Especially nice mid-winter when I’m longing for summer tomatoes.

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And thankfully, there’s plenty of basil. 

 See what other garden bloggers are harvesting at Harvest Monday, hosted by Our Happy Acres.

California Hills in August

California Hills in August

In My San Diego Garden & Kitchen

In My San Diego Garden & Kitchen