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Scenes from the Early Winter Garden--Snow Peas and Sweet Peas

November 15, 2011

The snow peas are thickly sown per Jim Crockett (Crockett’s Victory Garden), about one inch apart in a trench. See last winter’s snow peas.

Snow Peas ‘Golden Sweet Edible Podded’

Pea brush as early support until they find the six foot trellis behind.

Errant sweet peas sprouted in the gravel, suggesting it’s a good time to plant.

Gather what’s needed to plant the sweet peas and snow peas: seed saved from last year, soil inoculant and pea brush.

Nicking the seed with a file hastens germination. Apparently soaking overnight does not per comparison studies. Nicking takes time but read about some shortcuts.

Snow pea seed moistened and sprinkled with soil inoculant (nitrogen fixing bacteria).

Snow peas scattered “thickly” in trench that has been enriched with several inches of compost. More on growing sweet peas on an earlier post, A Good Time to Plant Sweet Peas.

Read Robert Frost’s poem Pea Brush from last March’s post. Here’s the first stanza:

I walked down alone Sunday after church
To the place where John has been cutting trees
To see for myself about the birch
He said I could have to bush my peas.

Reflections on November in Massachusetts

Scenes from the Early Winter Garden--Greens